sylphierouge:

When people ask me why I’m going back to school now.
And cheesecake

mmm, cheesecake.  
Oh and yes, Do The Thing.

sylphierouge:

When people ask me why I’m going back to school now.

And cheesecake

mmm, cheesecake.  

Oh and yes, Do The Thing.

larstheyeti:

I think Fall came early this year.
http://theawkwardyeti.com

This is so true.

larstheyeti:

I think Fall came early this year.

http://theawkwardyeti.com

This is so true.

winkbooks:

There are no glittering castles, no Prince Charmings, and no happy endings when you peer into Beautiful Darkness

Beautiful Darkness
by Fabien Vehlmann and Kerascoët
Drawn & Quarterly
2014, 96 pages, 8.125 x 11 inches
$14 Buy a copy on Amazon

Beautiful Darkness begins at a lovely tea party with a Princess-like Aurora entertaining her would-be paramour, the dashing, princely Hector. She serves cakes and hot chocolate, aided by her friend and wannabe handmaiden, Plim. Everything is going swimmingly as the cooing couple lean in for their first kiss. Suddenly, the sky starts falling. Weeping, stinky pink goo begins to rain down all around and over them, into their cocoa, onto their heads. Soon they are struggling against drowning as the putrefaction fills the room. But as Aurora, now panicked and separated from the others, finally finds her opening to freedom, we realize that the thwarted tea party was inside the decaying corpse of a little girl in the woods. As the Lilliputian Aurora crawls from her nostril into the rainy darkness, a “wide shot” image shows dozens of other tiny people fleeing from every orifice of the decaying child. 

And then the story becomes seriously sick, twisted, and sad.

Beautiful Darkness, by French comics writer Fabien Vehlmann and husband and wife artist team Marie Pommepuy and Sébastien Cosset (known together as Kerascoët), perfectly embodies its title. It is an “anti-fairy tale,” beautifully rendered and breathtakingly dark. It takes all of the innocence and moral deliverables of whitewashed Grimm and other classic fairy tales and turns them on their head (and cavorts within their decaying innards). 

Aurora invites the forest animals to a lovely woodland gathering and they… well, they act like animals, eating everything; trashing the place. The sweet, frightened one-eyed girl (who’s also a new mother) is not accepted by the others, she’s brutalized by them. The giant-eyed dolly-like girl feeds on the maggots of the corpse from within a stockade of colored pencils taken from the dead girl’s book-bag. No one seems to have a working moral compass as the feral tribe of tiny people, led by the ever-chipper Aurora, goes into marooned survivor mode, forced to adjust to life outside of their previous corpse home. 

But I’ve already given away too much. The point is to accept the worst, because that’s what you’re going to get. The book is beautifully drawn and water-colored, well-paced, and the characters have real depth to them impressively developed over its short 96 pages. But it can be tough going. It’s so unrelentingly grim, it’s hard to imagine what the ultimate point is, other than to act as a bracing anecdote to every cookie-cutter happily-ever-after you’ve ever rolled your eyes at. – Gareth Branwyn

September 3, 2014

Oddly, Want.

Yep.

For women, heart attacks look different.

distractedbyshinyobjects:

This link has inspired me to do a thought experiment, follow me down the rabbit hole for a second:

I’ve long wondered if this - the fact that women don’t recognize the symptoms of a heart attack in themselves or other women, and consequently don’t get the fast care that is vital for heart attack survival - could be a reason heart disease is the #1 killer in women. Women statistically take better care of themselves health-wise, than men do. Women see doctors more frequently and are more likely to follow those doctors’ recommendations closely. So why wouldn’t women be at least as good at caring for their hearts as men?

Heart attack symptoms in men are well known, we witness them all the time on TV. We all know what it means when a guy clutches his chest or left arm and falls over, gasping for breath. This scene is often followed by a rush to the emergency room in an ambulance, and a shirtless guy being shocked back to sinus rhythm with electric paddles. “CLEAR!” Right? Everyone knows that’s what a heart attack looks like. Because of TV.

Except you can’t show a topless woman on TV - and you can’t defibrillate a woman in a bra. So victims of heart attacks on TV are *always* male. Did you know that a woman having a heart attack is more likely to have back or jaw pain than chest or left arm pain? I didn’t - because I’ve never seen a woman having a heart attack. I’ve been trained in CPR and Advanced First Aid by the Red Cross over 15 times in my life, the videos and booklets always have a guy and say the same thing about clutching his chest and/or bicep.

And people laugh when I tell them women are still invisible in this world.

UPDATE: So, it’s been brought to my attention that the language/information in both the original article and my commentary is not trans* friendly, and for my part of that, I sincerely apologize.

I’m not a doctor and I don’t know how a heart attack would present itself in a M2F or F2M on hormone therapy, or with any other medical differences that affect this kind of thing. I also don’t know if there’s been enough research for the medical community at large to know either - cursory googling hasn’t given me any satisfactory info. If this affects you, I’d recommend asking your trusted physician. Talk about being invisible.

UPDATE 2: This post is the most popular thing I’ve ever said anywhere. I couldn’t be happier that this message has reached so many people.

It may seem insignificant to talk about TV in so serious a conversation as that of women’s heart health, but this stuff has far-reaching, real-life consequences.

I’m really glad people are using my post as a reason to educate themselves on heart attack symptoms and to think critically about the quality of representation of women, women’s health, and women’s bodies in the media we consume.

sylphierouge:

kittydoom:

sgtsatine:

randomweas:

Did Someone Say Cake?

I stared at these gifs for waaaaayyyyy longer than I should have.

CAKE

* i wanna cake*

Mmm Cake.

windypoplarsroom:

Lee Man Fong
"Ikan mas koki"

windypoplarsroom:

Lee Man Fong

"Ikan mas koki"

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Indeed.

annabellehector:


Caddisfly larvae (Trichoptera) build protective cases using materials found in their environment. Artist Hubert Duprat supplied them with gold leaf and precious stones. This is what they created.

annabellehector:

Caddisfly larvae (Trichoptera) build protective cases using materials found in their environment. Artist Hubert Duprat supplied them with gold leaf and precious stones. This is what they created.

vforenterasan:

Akinobu makes architectural models for a living in Tokyo, but in his spare time he creates all matter of small objects in bottles. These pinky sized dinosaur skeletons are especially awesome. (via bb)

 

I love these.